10 Collectable Cars You Need To Buy Right Now – /ROAD TESTAMENT

10 Collectable Cars You Need To Buy Right Now – /ROAD TESTAMENT


IAN WHELAN: All right. We’re rolling, Mike. MIKE SPINELLI: Hey. Welcome to “Road Testament.”
Today we’re talking about the 10 collectible cars you need to
buy today because they’re going up in value. Ian Whelan is with us. IAN WHELAN: Hey, Mike. MIKE SPINELLI: Usually
behind the camera. Today he’s in front of it. That’s today on “Road
Testament.” [THEME MUSIC] Hey. Welcome to “Road Testament.”
Ian is controlling our screen from here. We are the only ones
in the office. @drive on Twitter. Facebook.com/drivetv. And we’re talking today about
collectible cars. So what we did was– I went through Keith Martin’s
“Sports Car Market Pocket Price Guide,” which
came out recently. And they pick– usually it’s big collectors
looking through there, looking at cars that are going up
tremendously in value. So your Ferraris, your– what else? What else is there? Are there any cars that
go up to the millions? Your Ferraris, your Cobras,
your all that stuff. But I went through and looked at
lower-priced cars that have gone up in price and value
in the last year. IAN WHELAN: So they’re a good
start for collectors. MIKE SPINELLI: Yes. So a good start for
collectors. Cars that you may not think of
when you think of collectible cars, but these are the ones
that we think, based on their predictions, are going
to do really well. IAN WHELAN: And you could still
enjoy these cars now. They’re not so expensive that
you’re going to be afraid to put some miles on them and
actually drive around and have some fun. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah. And in some cases, they’re going
to be cars that you’re going to need to wrench
on, and in some cases, maybe they won’t be. So cars you can actually
enjoy. BMW Bavaria. So the Europeans will be saying,
what is a BMW Bavaria? Ian, you want to
take that one? IAN WHELAN: Well, it was based
on the BMW 2500 and 2800 that, I guess, we had in the United
States and they had in Europe. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah, one of
the new 6’s that became, eventually, the 5 Series. IAN WHELAN: And our BMW importer
extraordinaire, Max Hoffman, he ordered a special
version, which had– I guess it was based on the 2500
spec but with the bigger engine from the 2800, so it was
sort of a stripper model with a bigger engine,
like a hot rod. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah,
kind of like an American muscle car, right? So he took the lower model. It had the cloth seats. It had the roll-up windows,
and he put the bigger engine in it. It eventually had
the three liter. So we’re talking about ’71
to ’74 being the most collectible. I think they’ve gone up 8% in
value in the last year. Now, it’s a car that has been
traditionally not something that anybody wanted
to collect. There were a lot
of them around. What do you think? IAN WHELAN: Yeah, I think it’s
a really stylish-looking car. It’s kind of ahead of its
time, in some ways, considering the age of it. The BMWs from the ’80s
still looked like this, the 828, 5 Series. MIKE SPINELLI: It’s true, and
the interesting thing about BMW is that as BMWs are becoming
more complex, and people are starting to look to
the previous generations for a more stripped-down experience,
they’re already doing with the E30, the E33 Series, which are
going up tremendously in value and hard to find, if you can
even find a good one, especially an M3. These are kind of getting
the same effect that’s going on with that. But 8% in a year, not bad. We’re looking down the road,
maybe more than that. IAN WHELAN: Why not? I mean, it’s a fun car. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah. So what’s next? It’s a 911SC. So what’s the deal with 911SC,
especially a Targa? Why the hell would
you want that? IAN WHELAN: I guess the Targa
is probably the least desirable version, but it’s
still a great-looking car. It’s still a 911, and you
get wind in your hair. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah, and the
cool thing about the SC is– so what’s happening, basically,
is that now people are looking to the air-cooled
911’s, and they’re all going up in value. Obviously, it’s the
993 versions– the last air-cooled ones– that
are going up the most. But the good thing about
the SCs are– to clear it up, it’s ’78
to ’83, I think, right? So right now, we’re looking at
the SC being a generation in which they corrected
a lot of things. IAN WHELAN: It’s kind
of a sweet spot. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah. It is a sweet spot, because it’s
still inexpensive enough that you might find one from
$15,000 to $20,000. I mean, it’s not like paperboy
money, but $15,000 to $20,000, you can get most of the things
that had been wrong with the 911 before that, with the
previous generation’s 2.7-liter engine had problems. In 1975, they galvanized them,
the bodies, so they stopped rusting as much. So the SC corrected a lot of
problems, and yet they’re not as sought after as the Carrera
3.2’s that came later, or the 964’s, or the 993’s. So you can get into a really
good 911 for not that much money, and they’ve gone up
about 6% to 7% in value. And now, 911’s have never really
been appreciative. So they haven’t been cars that
you buy and get a lot of appreciation out of. They’ve been holding
their value. But these are actually starting
to go up in value. IAN WHELAN: I wonder if they’re
going up a little bit because people around my age
might want to get into a 911, and maybe they’re seeing that
they’re good values and putting a little bit of
money into these now. MIKE SPINELLI: And that this
generation was the first one that was kind of considered
bulletproof. IAN WHELAN: And it’s
kind of still the traditional classic Porsche. It has a really simple interior,
so this is still a basic sports car,
which is nice. MIKE SPINELLI: Cool. What do we got next? Oh, this is your domain. So you’re the Saab
guy around here. IAN WHELAN: Yeah. I’ve had a few Saabs
and still do. And I never had a 99, but I
always liked the EMS, which was a great-looking car. MIKE SPINELLI: Now this
is a ’74 EMS, right? So the “Sports Car Market Price
Guide” is looking at the EMS as one of the ones
that are going up a little bit in value. What’s the EMS about? IAN WHELAN: EMS stood for
Electronic Manual Special, so it was like the equivalent
of the 2002tii. It had fuel injection, but it
had sport suspension, and faster steering rack, and a
nicer interior, so it’s kind of the sports version
of the 99. Of course, this was a
time when they were building rally cars. It was closely related
to their actual rally car at the time. MIKE SPINELLI: And
this is just– I love this generation. I love the 99s. I think they look amazing, and
they still look up to date. But even more so in going up
in value is the Turbo– is the 99 Turbo. This is a little newer. That was a ’74, and this is– IAN WHELAN: This is the
three-door version. The other one was the two-door
with the notch back. It’s a little bit newer of a
car, and the styling’s a little bit different on the
front end, but not very much. But this was pretty much a
breakthrough car for the time. It was a mass-produced,
turbo-charged car. There had been some
other turbo cars on the market before– production cars– but
they just weren’t as well-engineered as this and
as well thought out. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah. It kind of made the Turbo– honestly, as a real enthusiast’s
choice. Interestingly, maybe because of
Saabs just going away right now, that interest in previous
Saabs has really heightened at this point. And this one’s gone up 7%
to 8% since last year. That’s not too bad. Again, it’s about finding
one, though. It’s about looking around
and finding one. IAN WHELAN: You’ve got
to find a nice one. I wonder if the value went up a
little bit since “Top Gear” did a feature on Saab’s demise,
which was, in my opinion, not a very
good feature. But they did actually like this
car, and they featured it quite a bit. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah, I mean,
the “Top Gear” effect could definitely be in effect. Sunbeam Alpine. So the Alpine– there were like three series
in the middle of the ’60s, like between the
’50s and ’60s. All of them basically had a 1.5,
1.6, 1.7 liter through the series. I’ve always loved the design
of the Alpine. Now, obviously, it’s the
Alpine’s brother with the Ford V8 that’s the one that
gets all the– IAN WHELAN: The Tiger. MIKE SPINELLI: The Tiger
gets all the respect. Because, like the Cobra, the
Tiger had a 289 V8 in it. IAN WHELAN: You’re not going to
be able to get one of those for less than $20,000. MIKE SPINELLI: No. That’s not something you’re
going to [INAUDIBLE]. But you could probably pick up
an Alpine, and actually went up 14% in a year. IAN WHELAN: It’s a really
good-looking car. And, I don’t know, it seems like
something different than all the Mg’s and Triumphs that
you see, as far as British sports cars go. MIKE SPINELLI: And you can
get one for $10,000. Remember “Dr. No,” where Bond
steps off the plane in the Bahamas and rents one and
immediately gets chased by– IAN WHELAN: The good old days. I wish I could do that now. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah, exactly. OK, what do you got next? So there’s Britt Ekland on her
way to Rod Stewart’s house in the Triumph TR7. So this is actually
an older model. So the TR7 is a car that gets
absolutely no respect, I think, at least among
people that I know. But it’s actually– if you get a later model
one, if you go– when they moved production to
Coventry in the later part of the ’70s, the build quality
actually was pretty decent. IAN WHELAN: It’s not
a bad-looking car. When I was a kid, somebody had
one of these near where I lived, and I thought
it was really cool. Just that wedge shape thing. Wedge-shaped cars were cool
in the ’70s and ’80s. MIKE SPINELLI: Well, it’s weird,
because it’s a real divisive shape. Because Triumphs were always– the design was much more fluid
and not as much of an axe. IAN WHELAN: This was a
departure from that. MIKE SPINELLI: This was kind
of a departure from that. But the later year TR7’s– ’79 to ’81– have gone up a decent amount in
the last couple of years. IAN WHELAN: This is
a cool photo. MIKE SPINELLI: The
Volvo P1800. The one, though, that is going
up in value is the 1800S. So I didn’t know this, but
the original P1800s were made by Jensen. IAN WHELAN: That’s
weird, right? MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah, Volvo
contracted with Jensen Motors in the UK to build it. Now Jensen, you know, is later
having built the Jensen Interceptor, the British sports
car with the giant Mopar 440, or it had the
383 at first, and then the 440 after. IAN WHELAN: That’s a cool car. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah, that was
a hell of a car, but they built this at first. That’s not really the
one you want. There were some issues. But the one you want was– the
reason why they called it the 1800S is because the S
stands for Sweden. And they brought production
to Sweden in 1963. And so you want the
ones post-1963. I mean, 10% year over
year value increase. That’s not too bad. IAN WHELAN: It’s a great-looking
car. It looks like a concept car or
something from the time. It’s really cool. MIKE SPINELLI: The shape
has really held up. And you can get them– I’ve seen them for $5,000
to $10,000 all day long. IAN WHELAN: They’re
not that fast or anything, but they’re cool. MIKE SPINELLI: Well, that’s kind
of a recurring theme with all these cars. So if you’re looking for the
fastest cars you could collect, this is not going to be
the– but it’s like having a piece of art in
your driveway. IAN WHELAN: I think the slow
car, fast thing applies. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah,
it applies on basically all these. So Karmann Ghia. OK, it applies nowhere near
as much as it does here. IAN WHELAN: This is
slow car, slow. MIKE SPINELLI: This could be– I mean, the Karmann Ghia is
another one of those timeless shapes that you have to really
love it, because you’re going to be in it a while. It’s going to take you a
while to get places. IAN WHELAN: It will
still turn heads. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah. It’ll just turn them very
slowly as you pass. IAN WHELAN: I actually have an
old brochure of this car, and it was a VW brochure, and they
were comparing it to, I think, the 356 at the time. Or it might have been an early
911, and they were sort of touting it as the poor
man’s Porsche. MIKE SPINELLI: The
poor man’s 356? IAN WHELAN: I mean, it
has the styling, but that’s pretty much it. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah. I’ve always liked them. It would be something you’d put
in your garage and drive once in a while. IAN WHELAN: Take your girlfriend
out when you don’t want to scare her too much. MIKE SPINELLI: But as a
collectible, obviously, you want to get the best
ones that you can. Same rules apply in
all collecting. But this one is a really
super old one. I think this is, like, a ’57. So if you could go to the ’50s
and get a decent one, you’re into big money. But it’s the later ones in the
’60s, the later part of the ’60s, that there were so many
around that you can go to California and probably buy
three of them for whatever is in your pocket. So why, do you ask, is there
a 1978 Corvette up here? Well, this is the Silver
Anniversary Corvette. Now, I know what you
think of Corvettes. IAN WHELAN: I love Corvettes. C3’s just not my favorite. MIKE SPINELLI: So the C3– having grown up with the C3, I’m
sort of partial to them, even though they’re probably not
the ones you want to get. At the trough of Corvettedom– 1975– I think they had
140 horsepower. This one– OK, so if you get the L48,
it’s 185 horsepower. If you get the optional L82,
you’re into almost 200 horsepower. IAN WHELAN: It really needs
those wide tires to keep all that power on the ground. MIKE SPINELLI: However, the
anniversary model has actually appreciated a decent amount
in the last year. And you can get an amazing
mint condition one for, like, $12,000. IAN WHELAN: That’s something. If you want to get a classic
Corvette, that’s pretty cool that you could spend that kind
of money and get something that looks like this. It’s a cool shape. Even though it’s not my
favorite Corvette, I acknowledge it’s a cool-looking
shape. And you certainly aren’t going
to get a C2 for that kind of money now. And your probably don’t
want an early C4. MIKE SPINELLI: That’s the
thing is that with all– Corvettes outside of this
sphere, like the ’60s– I mean, they’re all going
up in ridiculous jumps. So here’s one that you can get
in on the ground floor with. I remember when you
could get a 454– a ’72 454 C3 for, like,
$5,000 or $6,000. And now you’re looking at
$30,000 or $40,000. Obviously, if you have a Burt
Reynolds fetish of some kind– and not that he drove one– but
this reminds me of that era, the whole “Gator,”
“Hooper” era. IAN WHELAN: I’m guessing by now
if you wanted to get some more power out of that engine,
there’s ways to do it. MIKE SPINELLI: There’s ways to
do it, but then you would– you really almost want
it to stay as showroom stock as possible. IAN WHELAN: If you’re
collecting. MIKE SPINELLI: And
that’s the thing. If you’re collecting it, you
kind of want it to be as slow as possible, because that just
proves that it’s original. IAN WHELAN: It’s totally
legit that way. MIKE SPINELLI: Exactly. So what’s next? Oh, look at this. An actual car. IAN WHELAN: This is a fast
car you can drive fast. MIKE SPINELLI: A fast car
you can drive fast. So the Mark IV Toyota
Supra with the 2JZ. IAN WHELAN: It’s a cool car. I think that car still looks
kind of modern now. MIKE SPINELLI: Now, honestly,
I didn’t realize that these things were appreciating. 8% year over year. It makes sense to me, because
it’s getting harder to find a good, clean, original turbo,
because of– we’ll call it the “Fast and the Furious” effect. IAN WHELAN: As explored by
our friend, Matt Farah. MATT FARAH: The internet says
that all Supras have to have 1,000 horsepower. But I’ve driven a 1,000
horsepower Supra, and let me tell you what most people won’t
tell you about a 1,000 horsepower Supra. It sucks as a street car. MIKE SPINELLI: Yes, Matt Farah
so eloquently put it. If you can find one, I would
say it’s a very good investment. And, actually, the prices
are bearing that out. IAN WHELAN: When I was in high
school, this was the most amazing car. MIKE SPINELLI: Yeah. 320 horsepower. I mean, that was when 300
horsepower was like, oh my god, 320 horsepower. That’s significant. IAN WHELAN: This
was high tech. Twin turbo. Had what I thought at
the time was a cool, big wing on the back. It’s part of the charm,
I guess, now. MIKE SPINELLI: So, interestingly
enough, this is the one that’s going up in
value, because this is obviously the most sought after,
the hardest to find. But if you do find one– this one, actually, I think,
has a lot of really serious upside potential. If you can get a really good
one, I think you’ll double your money in 10 years. In car collecting years,
actually, it’s like two. IAN WHELAN: All these cars have
a lot of potential to do really well and double money
because they’re not worth that much yet. Once you get higher end cars,
it’s harder to do that. MIKE SPINELLI: Again, the
problem with this is sort of the opposite problem of buying
a British car, where the engine is just so complex
that, eventually– probably it’s not too hard to
find parts, and you can find manuals and stuff online, and
there are plenty of super enthusiast forums and stuff you
could find out how to work on that motor. But it’s a complex motor– oh, sorry, engine. Obviously, people hate when we
say “motor.” Anyway, what do we got next? So this one– the Triumph Spitfire. I had no idea the Triumph
Spitfire, from– I think it’s like ’62 to ’70– this is a ’68. Went up 28%. 38%. I misspoke. 38%. IAN WHELAN: That’s
pretty amazing. MIKE SPINELLI: That
is pretty amazing. IAN WHELAN: Get one of
these while you can. MIKE SPINELLI: So it probably
went up from what, like, $3,000 to $4,500 or something. IAN WHELAN: That’s still
pretty good. MIKE SPINELLI: That’s not bad. So somehow, there is a run on
’60s-era Triumph Spitfires. So you should probably
get in on one. I just think, honestly,
that the Spitfire is– it’s my second-favorite
Triumph, but I love this design. I mean, just this kink and the
way that the fenders and the quarter panels– IAN WHELAN: The long hood. MIKE SPINELLI: –come
together. The long hood. Again, I think this all comes
down to how many are left. So that’s it for “Road
Testament” today. We want to know when you think
are the best collectible cars. What car would you buy right now
if you could and you were looking down the road
to collect it? Ian Whelan– I’m not asking you. I’m asking them. @drive on Twitter. facebook.com/drivetv. And we’ll see you next week. Later. Now you’ve got to get up and
turn the camera off. Want me to do it? IAN WHELAN: No, I’ve got it. [THEME MUSIC]