10 Remarkable 3D Printed Vehicles That Became a Reality

10 Remarkable 3D Printed Vehicles That Became a Reality


– [Glen] If conventional vehicles are just too boring for you,
then take a look at these. This is Glen and here are
10 3D printed vehicles that redefine the auto industry. (steady upbeat music) – [Female Voice] Number 10. – [Glen] Taking its first
test run in September of 2014, Local Motor’s Strati claims to be the world’s first 3D printed car. Made from carbon fiber reinforced plastic that if damaged, could be melted down and reprinted into a new car. Taking only about 40 hours to be printed, the only thing left is the powertrain, electrical equipment and tires. The rest of the assembly
takes around four days. The little two-seater
can reach the top speed of 40 miles per hour and
the battery charge gives it a range of 100 to 120 miles. It’s also fitted with an
autonomous driving system so you can be a passenger
rather than a driver. The Strati was part of the
Essence of Autonomy Challenge, which gave the public the chance to submit improvements for the car. One such improvement is fly mode. No, the car can’t fly. But there is a drone attached
to the back of the car that can be used to scope
out the surrounding areas in the event of a traffic jam, while a live feed is sent directly to the two monitors
installed in the dashboard. While this car hasn’t made
it to full production yet, the estimated price is a sweet $18,000. – [Female Voice] Number nine. – [Glen] Another edition by Local Motors was designed to be the first 3D printed car series for customer use. The idea went from a design to a complete prototype
in just two months. The Swim is made up of
75% 3D printed parts with the other 25% being auto parts that will not be 3D printed. The company plans to
change this in the future to make 90% of the car purely 3D printed. The Swim has a completely
electric powertrain, and the 3D printed design
allows the entire car to act as a roll cage, creating
a cleaner and safer vehicle. The design is also
customizable to each buyer. The inside of the cars
will all be the same but the outside will be unique. Although the LM3D Swim has
not made it to full production as of yet, the proposed price
point is around $50,000. – [Female Voice] Number eight. – [Glen] Local Motors is serious
about 3D printed vehicles. So serious that they
have a fully electric, self-driving 3D printed bus, cruising around National Harbor, Maryland, while driverless automation
may seem a little sketchy, Olli is jam packed with safety features. Olli comes equipped with
a laser targeting system mounted on the roof giving it 360 degree vision at all times. It also has sensors on the front and back to detect obstacles and pedestrians. There’s even another layer of protection as Olli is also monitored
by a human operator. Olli is also equipped with IBM Watson, Internet of Things technology so it can answer questions you may have, recommend restaurants for you, or alert you about the
weather for the day. Being completely electric,
Olli requires no fossil fuels to run, making it the smartest and most sustainable bus out there. Olli can seat up to eight passengers with handrails and room for
four standing passengers. It may not be the
fastest way to get around with its top speed
being 25 miles per hour, but you’ll be sure to enjoy the ride. Pricing starts out at $250,000 – [Female Voice] Number seven. – [Glen] Originally unveiled at the 2015 North America
International Auto Show, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
created a 3D replica of the 1965 Shelby Cobra to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the vehicle. The project went from idea
to full drivable vehicle in only six weeks, using the big area additive manufacturing machine, able to print objects
larger than 35 cubic feet. Located at Cincinnati Incorporated, the entire project kicked up enough dust that even President Obama and Vice President Joe
Biden went to visit. The 3D version only weighs 1,400 pounds, giving it a substantial weight decrease from the original 2,355 pounds. Printed with parts using 20%
carbon fiber reinforcement and given a classy surface finish, nothing on this car looks cheap. Since this is a one off, you won’t be able to get your hands on it. But you can go out and buy
an industrial 3D printer and make your own. – [Female Voice] Number six. – [Glen] This one’s for
all you RGB fans out there. German company EDAG Engineering
has created the Light Cocoon and calls it the ultimate in future lightweight construction. Inspired by leaves, the body of the car has a skeletal-like structure with a layer of fabric
covering the entire thing. The skeletal structure allows for extremely lightweight production, but also increases the
strength of the body. The fabric covering the
skeleton is four times lighter than copy paper, but it’s also
weatherproof and waterproof. The fabric allows light through and the entire car is backlit. Not only does the lighting look fantastic, but it was placed with the idea of being able to communicate non-verbally to other drivers on the road. The Light Cocoon even has a little brother called the Soulmate. The Soulmate expands upon
the same skeletal design and modifies it into a roadster style. The Soulmate takes the
already futuristic design and puts in a full touchscreen
interface for the driver. While these cars haven’t made it to full production lines yet, given the ease and low
cost of making the parts, I think we can all be excited for when we see them on the road. – [Female Voice] Number five. – [Glen] While this car
may look like something you can get on GTA 5, I don’t recommend you
drive it like you stole it, mainly because this car has
an insane amount of power. The Blade has a curb weight
of only 1,300 pounds, which is 1,000 pounds
lighter than a Miata, making it an extremely light supercar. With a 2.4 liter Mitsubishi
Evo 10 mid engine, it can produce 720 horsepower and go zero to 60 in about 2.2 seconds. The Blade has the driver’s seat directly in the middle of the car to give them the best
view of the road possible. It even has room for a passenger to sit tandem style behind the driver. The driving experience
is sure to be remembered, with its six speed sequential
gearbox and paddle shifters. Just because it’s fast
doesn’t mean it’s not safe. Using a state of the
art experimental factory with 3D metal printers,
and using techniques from the aerospace industry, the sleek design offers an
extremely safe printed body carbon fiber, aluminum and titanium make up the body, bonded
with aerospace techniques. The engine can also run on gasoline or compressed natural gas. This particular vehicle was made as a technology demonstration. So it’s not planning on
making it to production. But maybe you could ask Divergent with a pretty please
and a fistful of cash. – [Female Voice] Number four. – [Glen] This bike has the
ability to be a roadster, a cafe racer, a scrambler or really just whatever
you personalize it as ’cause it’s completely customizable. Italian Volt has given
the customer full control on how they want their bike to look. The frame, swing arm and
body work is all 3D printed to allow for the customer’s customization. Although given the frame, they might not be able
to make it a chopper. You also have the choice of any color and the wheels can come in
either aluminum or carbon fiber. The Lacama weighs 540 pounds and has a top speed of 110 miles per hour. With an all electric motor,
it has a range of 124 miles. The battery requires just three
hours to charge up to full but can shorten that time
with fast charging equipment. It even has a touchscreen that
displays the battery charge, GPS, and will connect to your phone. Pre-orders for this bike are available now with the full price being around $38,000. – [Female Voice] Number three. – [Glen] In 2015, a team of students entered the Shell
Eco-marathon Asia competition, and the Nanyang Venture 8 was born. The 3D printed body is only
half of the amazing features. Composed of a 3D printed body
that was completely designed, printed and assembled by the students. They make use of honeycomb structures and Kevlar reinforced carbon fiber. The body is composed of
150 different printed parts that are all mounted on
a carbon fiber frame. Not only is this car 3D printed, but it is also solar powered, with a battery completely
designed by the students that utilizes the same technology as Tesla but on a much smaller scale, with solar panels supplying
power to the entire car. It only weighs 120 pounds and can reach speeds of
almost 40 miles per hour. While the Venture 8 was specifically made for the Shell Eco-marathon,
nothing is stopping you from going out and designing your own. – [Female Voice] Number two. – [Glen] This one’s a little
bit of a two parter for you. The AIME Project and
PUV came from the idea of how we use energy in
our homes and vehicles and how they could be connected. So Oak Ridge National
Laboratory decided to fix that and print a house vehicle combo. That AIME house is completely 3D printed, which allows for complete customization. But the demo comes with the refrigerator, dishwasher, stove top, sink, microwave oven, and a Murphy bed. The structure is lined with solar panels to collect and even store
energy for the home and vehicle. The PUV, or printed utility vehicle, is 3D printed and reinforced
with carbon fiber. It weighs in at a whopping 4,000 pounds and has a hybrid powertrain. It uses a 14 kilowatt battery that provides it with a range of 35 miles. A secondary generator that
runs on compressed natural gas can extend the range to around 100 miles. Its speed tops out at
around 35 miles per hour. Currently it uses an
active research platform to demonstrate the ability
to integrate your home, vehicle and the energy they use. You won’t be able to find one for sale, but future uses for
this are the limitless. So don’t be surprised one day when your neighbor has an AIME home. Before we reveal our number one pick, don’t forget to comment
down below and let us know which 3D printed vehicle
you can’t live without. – [Female Voice] Number one. – [Glenn] It’s a smartcar. It’s an IQ. Nope, it’s the new 3D printed
LSEV all electric car. This collaboration
between Polymaker and XEV is on pace to be the first mass produced 3D printed electric car. This tiny little two-seater
is at the beginning of the 3D printing wave that’s about to take over
the automaker industry. Pretty much the entire car is 3D printed, except for the glass, seats and chassis. There are only 57 components,
which means production time is a fraction of what
traditional automakers need. Assembly of the vehicle
takes only three days including the time it
takes to print the parts. It’s also extremely light,
weighing just under 1,000 pounds. The completely electric powertrain allows for a range of 93 miles. The top speed of the LSEV
is 43 miles per hour. The LSEV has already had
over 7,000 pre-orders and deliveries are planned to start at the beginning of 2019. With the ease of assembly
with 3D printing, and the time saved in assembly costs, the price is as sweet as the car. You should be able to get one of your own for around $10,000. – Hey guys, this is Cassie. I hope you guys enjoyed this video. Tell us in the comments below what you found to be the
most interesting and why. Also, if you haven’t done so yet, make sure to hit the bell notification next to the subscribe
button to stay up-to-date with all of our latest videos. Thank you for watching. I’ll see you guys next time. (melodic music)