2020 Lincoln Corsair; How Crash Test Dummies Can Cause Injuries | Talking Cars #227

2020 Lincoln Corsair; How Crash Test Dummies Can Cause Injuries | Talking Cars #227


Hi, Talking Cars fans. We’ll be shooting an episode of
the podcast live at the 2019 LA Auto Show on Friday, November
22 between 10:00 AM and noon, and we would love to
have you in our audience. To join us, email
[email protected] by Friday, November
15 and let us know if you’d like to attend. You’ll be able to ask
questions of our experts. And has a special
benefit, you’ll receive free admission
to the LA Auto Show. All you have to do is get
yourself to the Los Angeles Convention Center. Tickets are first come first
serve, so email us today. We’d love to see you there. We offer our first impressions
of the all new 2020 Lincoln Corsair SUV. Then we discuss why
cars don’t protect women as well in crashes. And finally, we answer questions
from the audience this week on Talking Cars. Hey, welcome back. I’m Keith Barry. I’m Jennifer Stockburger. I’m Emily Thomas. That’s Dr. Emily Thomas. It is. Yes, so we’re
really glad to have Emily on the podcast with us. You might recognize her from
the opening credits, but– Yeah, I’ve been on this show for
a really long time, actually. Every week, actually. So yeah, you’re here because one
of the coolest things I think about CR is that we have these
really brilliant people who work with us who are preeminent
experts in their fields. And they can help the writers
like me make our work better, because we don’t have to
necessarily go find the source. Right. We just– We ask them. Exactly. I’m over in your side of
the office all the time. I thought it was the chocolate
that brought you over. It is that, sometimes. So Emily, why don’t you tell
us about what you do at CR? So I am the crash expert
on the child seat team. And so basically, I oversee the
crash protection performance of our evaluation. And kind of the in-house
crash expert in general for automotive safety. I also on the vehicle side,
do the rear seat evaluation of child seat fit, and looking
at different safety aspects in the vehicle that
affects rear occupants. So that’s kind of my wheelhouse. And both of you have
a background in crash, and safety, and
automotive safety. And that’s kind of the
reason why we’re here. There’s been a lot
of news this week– there’s been a lot
of news this week. But I think– We’re going to narrow it to one. We’re going to narrow
to one thing, which is a topic, which we all at
CR think is really important. And it’s a topic that
isn’t necessarily new. In fact, it’s four
decades old right. But the fact we’re
still talking about it is the reason why we
have to talk about it. So this week, CR
published our report looking at crash
testing, and who gets hurt in crashes
when they happen, and how some people get
hurt more than others. So Jen, do you want to sort
of walk us through some of the stats there? Sure. So first of all, Keith’s
being modest, because he wrote the story and it’s awesome. With a lot of help. With a lot of help. But it’s on ConsumerReports.org. It’s a great read. But the reason you said it’s
four decades in the making, but why it’s coming
up again, is there’s some new data from the
University of Virginia that points out that the
odds of females being injured in frontal crashes when
they’re in the driver’s seat or the front passenger
seat are 73% greater than the odds of their
male counterparts. So if a crash happens,
a female front vehicle occupant who’s wearing
a seat belt, 73% more likely to sustain
an injury than male. Her odds of being
injured are 73% more. Same car, same type
of crash, same issues. Right. And the idea is
and the theory is– first of all, crash testing
has benefited all of us. A lot of the
occupant protection, be it seat belt,
pretensioners, slow limiters, airbags, crumple zones
have benefited, all. And much of that has
been from crash testing. But the theory is that are
women being underrepresented in the crash testing, be
it the federal government, the Insurance Institute,
whoever is doing it, because the dummy is a
male dummy– represents a 50th percentile. The dummy that’s used most often
is that 50th percentile male. So an average male. Right, an average male size. At least an average
male from the 1970s. Right. So when the automakers are doing
designs and counter measures to protect occupants, are
they more geared toward men, and thus, this data that say
women may be put at more risk. And are the dummies really
representative of women? So to back it up
a little bit, we talk about what dummies
are available to us, right? So in the dummy
family, you really have the 50th
percentile male, which is kind of used to represent
the average person– not even just the
average male anymore. And when the dummy
was first introduced, that made sense, because at
that time, the people that were dying in motor
vehicle crashes were men, because men
were driving to work, men were the ones– This is from the 1960s. They were the ones
transporting people around. And so they were
the ones that were getting injured [INAUDIBLE]. Made sense. And a lot of the data
came from the military as well too, where the data they
had was based on male bodies. Right. So then after we have
the 50th percentile male, they want to expand the
dummy family, and they did. But in that expansion,
there were some compromises that got made. So we ended up with things
like the 95th percentile male. We got the 5th
percentile female. And we got some
pediatric dummies. So very large man. Very large man. Very small. Very small. Really, the 5th
percentile female is exactly what it sounds like. It represents 5% of
the female population, the lower 5% in terms
of height and weight. So the outside dimensions are
supposed to be representative. But even there, they
didn’t use female data. They scaled the average man down
to be the size of 5% of women– small women. Right. And that’s where they’re
finding the differences, right? Right. And the 5th percentile female
is also really commonly used as a replacement for your
12 to 13-year-old child in crash testing. So it’s a very
small stature woman. It’s 4’11” and 108 pounds. Very small. That’s a very petite dummy. A very petite woman who also
can sit-in place as a 12 to 13-year-old child
can crash testing. So that kind of
gives you an idea as to how it’s doing double
duty, but that it’s not really representative of women at
large in the population, right? And so that’s the challenge. In the crash tests world,
we have this one dummy who’s supposed to
represent everybody. But if you even look
at this table here, I mean, I’m probably
the shortest– I’m probably the closest to
the 5th percentile, at least by height. But obviously, there
are differences between me and Keith and
Jen and Keith that are more than just our size, right? The list is way long. So this is a
question that I get, which is a lot of
people say, well, how come you can’t just pick
a one size fits all dummy? And I think people think of
dummies as like mannequins. They think of them as– as I’ve learned from
you, I’ve learned words like biofidelity–
and why don’t you why don’t you explain
to everyone else? So I guess we’ll start
with the word you threw our that nobody knows. So biofidelic means anything
that you’re trying to do and the automotive
industry when you’re trying to represent humans,
you want it to be biofidelic. You want it to best represent
the actual living form that it’s supposed to
be a surrogate for. So if you have a
crash test dummy, it’s mostly representing people. So there are a bunch
of calibrations and a bunch of testing that is
done to ensure that this crash test dummy is going to
perform in a way that is most representative of how
a human body would perform in a crash. And so there’s years of research
that has gone into this. The challenge is that
a lot of that research, again, is either based
off of males, right? And so once again, you have now
these male material properties that are being used to
calibrate and validate these physical crash
test dummies that are now supposed to
represent both men and women. But biomechanically,
that’s not true. We’re very different. The differences between us
include our bone geometry, they include the bone
density, it includes just even the material properties
between our tendons, and our ligaments,
and how our bones respond to the external forces
that are being applied to them. So there’s all of these
really important– It’s not just size. Yeah. Exactly. It’s not just size. There’s a lot of really
important details that determine how my body is going
to react differently in a crash because of how it’s built
versus how your body is going to react in a crash. And this idea that
crash test dummies– they’re almost there
as like a ballast. It’s like they’re just there
to look fit in the spot, be the right outside size, and
be weight, and be in this crash test. It’s so much more than that. The thing which really
gets to me is that there are 50% of drivers are female. 50% the population is
female in the United States. And the fact that we
just assume that these are sort of outliers,
statistically speaking, that can’t be the case. Right. I was saying science in
this case didn’t quite keep up with society. Women are in the driver’s
seat half the time at least. And we didn’t quite get there. And that was kind of the call
to action in that we need this. And we’ve known about this– I’m very proud of
the article you did. Yeah, you did a great job. But if you look, you can
find similar articles from earlier this year– 2014, 2011, the 1980s. CR Wrote about it in the 1970s. Said, with these new
crash test dummies, do they really represent
everybody in an archival issue. And nothing has
happened, which is– So nothing has happened maybe in
the physical crash test world. So where there have been
strides is in this world of computer simulations. So the automotive
industry has started to use computer
simulations to be able to test out their
vehicles, test out their safety equipment before doing
physical crash testing. Because physical crash
icing is really expensive and it takes super
long to set up. You literally have to–
like, a million bucks . And you have to buy
the car, crash the car. Exactly. It’s a very tedious and
very expensive ordeal. So the beauty of
computer simulations is that you can run a
bunch of different tests, do this whole like array of
testing to get a sense as to how the vehicle will perform,
how the entry metrics will come out. And so in that regard, there are
some automotive manufacturers that have actually created
female human body models using actual female material
property data– the stuff that we talked about
before, bone density, differences in ligament and
tendons, and bone geometry– and they’ve implemented that
into the models themselves. So I think Volvo has this
Eva model, which is– That’s one example. It’s one example– Toyota. It’s a computer model
of a 50th percentile female for rear impacts. Yes. So Volvo is not the only
one who’s done this. Other manufacturers have
also done something similar. And that’s a great
thing, because it means that we’re trying
to address the problem, but we need to do even more. And so ideally, we would see
NHTSA put out a call for us to have a physical
crash test dummy that represents the average female. And doing so would put
out money for research so we can get the
data that we need. But ultimately, we need to start
now, because if we don’t, we’re going to be in the same
boat another five, 10 years from now. We started back then– I don’t want to have to
write this article again. So you know– go to
consumerreports.org. I don’t give away too much. Go and look at it. It’s really well done. Yeah. And there’s a lot
of great examples. History. Lot of great history. We talked to some
amazing people. There are interviews with people
who started the crash test program in the ’70s. So really interesting stuff. So moving on a bit– I wish we could
talk about that– We could go all day on this. I can do my hard talk. We have a bunch of
new cars at our track. Yes. One of them– I have some very complex
feelings about this car. Oh my gosh. It’s the Lincoln Corsair. It’s a crossover SUV. It’s based on a similar
platform as the sort of same underpinnings
as the Ford Escape. Costs– rs it starts
in the 30s, but ours is the reserve all wheel
drive, so it’s almost $50,000, what we paid for it. 250 horsepower 2 liter four
cylinder turbo, the similar one to the Ford Escape. 8 speed automatic,
optional all wheel drive. I mean, I have my thoughts about
this car, but I’ll withhold. OK. I’ll sit back. What do you think? What do you think? So like in the borrowed Escape
with the 2 liter four cylinder turbo, I was very impressed
with the Corsair’s drivability. I thought it was good on the
highway, good around town. I think the size is lovely. Again, I go back to– I have these man
sized 15-year-olds that I take to school every day. I think they say
that every episode. They were– 68th percentile, 70th
percentile males. They were comfortable. Right, there you go. But they were comfortable. And the only difference is I
wasn’t too thrilled with some of the Lincoln cues inside. Like what? In that it had the
push button gears. Yeah. I prefer– again, I’m saying,
surprisingly, the rotary gear selector in the Ford. And it had the seat
adjustments on the door. Like the Mercedes style. Like the Mercedes. That’s what I wrote right
here, Mercedes-like. I must have tried to adjust my
seat three times on the side before I figured
out where they were. Yes. I just find it so
much more intuitive to have them on the seat
as opposed to the door in general, be it
Mercedes, Lincoln. So I actually liked those
smaller items, if you will. I liked the Ford style better
than the Lincoln style, but overall, it’s
a great little SUV. That Lincoln interior, though– Lincoln’s interiors have just– some Ford Interiors we’ve
seen have been not great. Right. Basic. And it’s like a whole
other world in there. Yeah. It was very plush, very fancy. Yes. I got to say– I like sedans– this is
the sort of first crossover that we’ve had that I thought,
I could see myself in this. This is why you’re torn. Yeah. This is a big deal for you. And there’s a hybrid version– [INAUDIBLE] drive
sedans on the weekends. Exactly, exactly. So the other thing about– and this is like a little thing,
and it’s not just in this car– Lincoln has this automatic
climate control right that has different levels. I think it’s the coolest
thing in the world, because you put it on automatic,
and it’s really hot outside, and it’s trying to cool it down,
and blows really, really loud, so then you change the fan,
then you lose your automatic. This one has three
levels for the automatic so you can make it basically,
loud, medium, or soft. I don’t think I noticed that. I think it’s genius. I often, to your point, adjust
the automatic climate control just because I’m annoyed
with the fan speed. Exactly. It’s not the
temperature, the problem. It’s the fan noise. I don’t like the fan
blowing you that much. That’s a good feature, yeah. This is incredible. What did you think of the car? You spent some decent
time in there, right? Yeah, I took it for the
weekend, and that was nice, because I got to drive
around it with my son. He’s in a car seat, right? He’s in a car seat. [INAUDIBLE] son, too. Mine is big 15-year old. Mine is one of the
pediatric dummies. He’s very smart. Yes. So I have a big car
seat too because he’s in a convertible right now,
and so it’s a rear facing. And even with rear facing,
I had to bring one of our DC colleagues to the airport, and
he could sit-in front of Mica comfortably. So there was still
plenty of room. And then my husband I kind of
take entrance in the back seat. So even when we were back
there, the rear seat cover was pretty good,
plenty of leg room. My husband was quite
thrilled by the fact there’s seat warmers in the back. He was like, look,
you’ll love it back here. But the other
thing that I really liked that I’m not sure
if anyone else really got to experience it is I
like the Ford rear seat belt reminder system. So what happened was
we were at the store, and it was pouring
over the weekend, And so I dropped them off at the
front, my husband and my son. And my husband was driving. And so when I
unbuckled in the back while the car was still
running, it automatically started dinging
him in the front. And I got out of the
car, went into the front to go park after
dropping them, and it was waiting for me to
acknowledge that the rear seat buckle had been undone. And so I really like that,
because a lot of those belt liners that I’ve seen,
they might remind you at first with them
the kind of go away, and so it’s really easy to
forget that it even happens or whatever. But like I like
that this required a response from the driver. So it helps you be a
little bit more responsible for your passengers. You just remind me them,
which right now, Mica can’t get himself out of his
car seat, but if he was older– Unbuckling themselves. Or all of your man teens that
you take around with you, you can be like, put
your belt back on. That’s definitely
something I didn’t notice. You mean your cat
doesn’t ride in the rear? No, my cat does not– actually, she does. But she does not have
a opposable thumbs, so it would be
very difficult to. Yeah, I guess that’s a problem. It’s very interesting–
I mean, the Corsair, I found it really drivable. The drivability was great. I took it through
some winding roads, And yet the handling was
really smooth and stable. Smooth ride, stable handling. It feels like a different
car to me than the Escape. It takes the good
things about the Escape, but it doesn’t feel like a
Ford that someone has badge engineered into a Lincoln. This is its own thing right. 8 speed automatic, they haven’t
always been implemented well, these multi speed
automatics [INAUDIBLE].. Pretty good. So I’m interested to find out. We’ll have all the
information when we’re done testing it soon. Right. On our road tests. But you can read our first
drive at ConsumerReports.org. So we’ve been talking a lot. I think it’s time to go to you. The questions you have sent
to us [email protected] We’ve got so many, we’re
trying to get to all of them. And we’re going to
start with one from DK. DK asks, how do anti-whiplash
front seats affect rear seat occupants, infants
and child seats, or children in booster seats,
especially in compact sedans rescue these where
there’s maybe only 30 inches between the front
in the rear headrests? I’m pretty tall so
my seat is always said to rear most position. Emily, I think this
one might be for you. How did he know I would be here? So I think first, I
just want to address what an anti-whiplash seat is. So probably the most common
one that people know about is the whips system by Volvo. It was like implemented
back in the late 1990s. and So the way that the
whips system works right you have these
front seat backs that move with the driver. So remember, in a
rear impact, you’re going to move into the impact. So you’re actually
moving backwards. So it moves with the driver
of the front seat occupant, but in a controlled fashion. So it’s not like it’s going to– front seat backs that
don’t have this device might do what we’ve
seen in some things on the news, where those
seat backs collapse, and there’s a lot of movement. That’s different. That’s a failure of the seat. Exactly. So this is totally different. This is controlled motion, and
it’s limited motion, right? And it really works best
with those pretensioners in your seat belt, because
the seat belt pretensions, helps keep the occupant
against the seat back so that together,
you’re moving. And I think of it
in the same way that your load limiter
works in a frontal impact. So a load limiter
on your seat belt, it allows for a controlled
amount of forward movement. But again, it’s controlled. So in that way, when you
want to answer DK’s question, I think that really, because
both your front and rear seat occupants are experiencing
the exact same physics, they’re both going to be
moving into the crash, so your rear seat
occupant is also going to be moving into the crash. Now I think that
that would probably be there’s less
possibility for interaction if your child is forward
facing or in a booster seat right behind you. Interaction meaning
the seat back hitting. Right, interaction between
the your front occupant and rear occupant. So if you have a child
who’s like rear facing, and you’re the only
front seat occupant, it’s just you as the driver,
don’t put them directly behind you. If that’s what you’re
concerned about, I would put them on
the passenger side because they’re closer to you. Even though they’re also going
to be moving into the impact, just if you want an
additional piece of mind. So there isn’t actually
any current research that I could find about the
impact on rear seat occupants, so that could be a really
great space for people to– Future article. Study. Future article. Rear seats– there isn’t a ton
of research on rear seat crash. Yeah. Cool. I learned so much. That’s the whole
point of working here. Question two is from
Nathaniel in Arlington, Mass, which I drive-through
every Monday morning. [INAUDIBLE] Every Thursday
night, I drive down, get off route 2 in
Arlington every week. So hi, Talking
Cars– hi, Nathaniel. Is it true that BMW will
charge a monthly fee for using Apple CarPlay
after the first year or two? Is this a new bad trend that
other automakers will follow? Yes! So I think so. So it is true. BMW is doing this. Remember when you first got
like a subscription service– Netflix or Hulu or
something, and there were like, two out there? And now there are like 15, you
have to subscribe to every one, it’s more expensive than cable? Right. I think the same exact
thing is going to happen. Subscription models are the
way to just sort of squeeze a little extra money
out of consumers. It’s anti-consumer,
it’s terrible. You think it’s a safety problem. Right, tell us what you
really think, Keith. But yeah, I think
CarPlay, Android Auto, anything that integrates
that activity in a safer way is safety benefit. Rather than using your phone. I hate to see them
charged for this. Yeah, it’s awful, it’s
a race to the bottom. I hate to see them
opting back to the phone. Yeah. And we’re going
to be we’re going to be loudly out there
saying, please don’t do this. We’ve already seen a
couple automakers in Europe are starting to do it. I’m sure it’s going to happen. I’m sure it’s going to happen. It’s awful. All right. Next question is from Edie. Hello, Talking Cars team. Appreciate your work and
I’ve been a loyal fan. Somehow, the years have
crept up and I’m now a senior driver with a
challenging lumbar spine. I have a 2004 Honda Accord V6
and I’m in need of a new ride. My ride’s no longer
comfortable for my current body and it’s definitely
not fuel efficient. These days, I’m among the many
who battled traffic in LA, and I would like to be driving
something safe, fun, and not too big. Most of the time, it’s just
me, 5’6″ with long legs, and my 12-year-old dog,
who I often have to lift into the Honda. I was considering– this
is a whole list– a Subaru Crosstrek, a Prius
Prime, regular Prius, or pay the big bucks and get
an Audi A4 or an all road. I like the idea of a
hatchback, but I’m flexible. Do you have any
suggestions for me? And Edie told us a great story
about driving a Porsche 911. Right. It was wonderful. It was wonderful. So thanks, Edie. I hope we have some questions. What do you think? We’ll start on this side. So I do like the Accord Hybrid. I she’s in an Accord, doesn’t
really love it right now. But in terms of getting
good fuel economy in LA, I asked our expat from
LA, and he’s like, well, even when you’re on the
highway, you’re basically like, driving in the city. The freeway. So you know, city mileage
seems to be important there. The other vehicle that
I also really like is the Cruze diesel. When we had that, I thought it
did really well for giving me great fuel economy. I thought it was pretty
comfortable, easy access to be able to put
your dog in and out. I mean, I was carting my car
seat and Mica in and out of it all the time. So I thought that
was a good pick. But to each their own, I guess. So we’ll see. And that’s kind of where I am. So seat, which we
see in our ratings all the time because
we have people of different stature,
and sizes, and all that, is very personal preference. Sometimes you fit and
sometimes you don’t. So I think I would say to Edie,
it may be less about the car, and more about
the adjustability. So when you’re picking
whatever it is you pick, and I do have a pick
for her, is make sure it has a power
adjust to driver’s seat so that you can tailor,
tilt, seat back, lumbar. And if you get to get
sore, you can change it while you’re driving. Yeah. If it starts to bother
your back as you’re sitting in LA traffic, you
can tweak it a little bit. And that would be my advice
regardless of what I pick. Even seat heaters can
make you more comfortable. Maybe she doesn’t
need it much in LA. But of all the
ones she suggested, I absolutely think
spend the money. Our front seat comfort
scores on the Audi A4 are very, very high. Subaru, not known for
super comfortable seats, a little flat, a little firm. Go with the Audi A4 or all road. Or you might want to look at
a Q3 for the dog and access there. So absolutely, Audi has the best
seat of all that you mentioned. I kind of got an undercard–
and I like your picks because they’re sedans,
but they’re roomy. And they’re much roomier
than they used to be in 2004. I like your pick because it’s– Because it’s a great car
and it has a great seat. But I kind of got this
undercurrent from Edie that she was talking
about fuel economy a lot, and that that was a thing
that I think she cares about. So my pick, if you don’t
mind going for something a little older, meaning
like, a year old, you can get a Lexus
CT 200H, which is a sort of smallish hybrid,
but very, very comfortable. Under $23,000. You can also get
an Audi A3 e-tron, which is a plug-in hybrid. It’s a 100% Audi,
it’s fun to drive, but it gets you that it
electric range from plug-in. And then it gets really
good fuel economy when you’re driving. The both of these cars have
been discontinued along with the Kruze diesel. But if you want, you can you
can get them certified preowned. I found a bunch in the LA area. So thanks for the
question, Edie. Maybe we’ll see you
at the LA auto show. Coming up. Yeah. Question four from Shane. I love listening to y’all. My only problem with the
podcast is that it’s not daily. Unfortunately, we have
other things we have to do. Thank you. My family’s growing,
we’re looking to replace one of
our two sedans. Having an SUV would be ideal
due to the added utility, convenience, especially since
we’ll be having a baby soon. Congratulations. We’re looking at used
compact SUVs around $10,000. We like the Toyota Rav4,
Honda CRV, Mazda CX5 the best, but are open to other options. Which would you recommend for
good blend of reliability, comfort, safety, and utility? This is tough. This is a tough number. I looked– I put like,
a sort of delineater there for 80,000
miles, for something that didn’t get marginal
or poor on crash tests, because that’s, I think,
the most important. Decent reliability
from our scores. And newer than say,
2011, because then you’ll get your electronic stability
control and the safety things. I found if you
push it up to 11k, you can get a 2013 CRV,
which is the second year after a major redesign. That would be what
I would choose. I would try and push it up
just a little bit to get that. You can find them– not a ton out there. And I would kind of stay away
from older versions of the RAV4 and CRV that might
cost less than that. The other thing is you could
get a 2012 Outback, Subaru. What do you think? So again, I did find it
challenging to hit 10k mark. And I was skewing
to the safety side, so I also put here if
you guys can stretch it, Shane, a little
bit, I was actually up maybe 14k, a
2015 or later CRV. I was going safety a
little bit more in that that’s when you could get
optional forward collision warning, automatic
emergency braking. Either a 2015 or later CRV,
or a 2015 Subaru Forester. You had Outback, I had Forester. Again, highly related, reliable
cars, those two were my picks. And Emily, I know you talked a
little about Sportage, Escape, some of the cars that he had
also mentioned that we cut for time from for his question. Yeah, so I looked
into all of them, and more just not looking
quite at the price so much, but really just looking at well,
if you have a baby coming– congratulations, once again– you’re going to be
installing car seats. So I looked at it more in
terms of to Jen’s point and your point, which did well
in crash safety testing, which come with these
additional advanced safety features as standard and
not necessarily optional. And then which have
good child seat fit. So unfortunately, the
Sportage, it’s OK. It did all right with being
able to install the car seats. You might find that those lower
anchors, which is probably what you’re going to
use in the beginning to install that
infant seat base, they were a little
bit tough to get to. And depending on whether
or not you want to you’ll put the baby in the middle,
that belt installation was kind of hard in the middle also. Same thing with the Escape. So honestly, of the
vehicles that he suggested that they
were interested in, the CX5 is my pick. And that’s purely based off
of preference and my ability to be able to install
car seats well. The amount of space that
you get in the cargo area– be prepared. You’re going to be packing like
you’re going for the apocalypse every time you go somewhere. So you need a lot of room. So when Mica was
small, I really liked being able to take the CX5
from work, because I found that I could install car seats,
it’s safe, it’s easy to drive, the controls are easy,
and there tons of room. One thing that’s interesting
you might not know is in our full road
test online, there is a whole section that
talks about how easy it is to install child seats. I do that. Thank you, Emily. You do that. And you’re not going to get
that from most other reviews out there. So Shane, good luck,
congratulations. Anyone else who has
a question for us, please send it to
[email protected] Send your video questions to us. We love video questions. We didn’t have any this week. Check out the show
notes to find out where these articles
that we have referenced in cell many times. This has been a
fact packed episode. And you can find them all
in there in the show notes. So thanks for watching. We’ll talk cars again soon.