American Pickers: Secret Collection of Retro Cars (Season 10) | History

American Pickers: Secret Collection of Retro Cars (Season 10) | History


MIKE: You’re about ready to FRANK: I know, Duesenbergs. MIKE: Auburn parts.
[whistle] [inaudible] FRANK: It’s right in here. Yep, there they are. Look at that car. FRANK: Oh, wow. When we first pull up, you can
tell things are different here. There’s all kinds of
classic Auburns and Cords parked outside the building. But there’s even
an airplane here. I mean, this is going to be
one of those picks to remember. Hello. DOUG: Come in. Hey, Doug. I’m Mike.
Nice to meet you. Hey Mike. You talked to
Dani on the phone. How are you doing?
I’m Frank. Nice to meet you. All right. I’m Doug Pray. I’m the president of the
Auburn Cord Dusenberg Factory. It’s been a family
thing since 1960s. Dani was saying
that your father bought the whole contents of
the factory out of Indiana. He did. Glenn Pray, my dad,
was a schoolteacher with no money who bought
an automobile factory and moved it to Oklahoma
and then started manufacturing Auburn and Cords. Yeah, he bought it
from Dallas Winslow, which was a very rich, famous
car builder of the day. Do you know what he
paid for it back then? About $80,000. And your dad’s a teacher. Right. So where did he get
that kind of cash? Well, that’s exactly what
Dallas Winslow asked him. He said, how are you
going to pay for it? He says, well, I’m going to
go home and sell some assets. And he’s thinking to himself,
well, I’ve got a TV set, and I’ve got a Cord, you know.
– Yeah. Right. And then he said, since you’re
the richest man I’ve ever met, he said, I thought I’d
borrow the rest from you. And the guy liked his guts and
his tenacity, and he said OK. So your dad was
just fearless, man. FRANK: Glenn Pray was a
classic American success story. I mean, this is a guy that
punched his own ticket, and he didn’t let
anyone stand in his way. Let me show you guys
something back here. We have a secret room
in this building. When I hear the words
secret room, I get intrigued. I’m thinking like
spy novels, Cold War, you know, 007 stuff,
but all I’m wondering is where is he taking us? This is the secret room. FRANK: We walk past
this plywood door, and I’m expecting a dungeon. OK. This is not what we expected. DOUG: My dad, Glenn,
said, I’m going to build an ageless automobile. I’m going to bring
back the Cord. He had a full-sized drawing of
what the car was going to look like on the wall, and he brought
his crew in here of eight guys, and he said, we’re
going to build that car around that
engine on that table. As the word got out that he
was building this modern day version of an original
Cord, reporters were coming from all over the country. That door right there opened,
and I’m a little kid in here, and somebody sneaks his
head around the corner, and behind him was a cameraman
with this great big camera. And dad goes over
to the door, and he says you guys have to wait
just like everybody else. You can’t come in, and he
slammed the door in his face. It was Walter Cronkite. And– MIKE: [laughter] FRANK: Oh, wow. DOUG: My dad told
off Walter Cronkite. MIKE: Your dad slammed the
door on Walter Cronkite. Man, your dad was just
constantly going for it. He was like reinventing
himself over and over and over. Yeah, I know. Glenn’s plan was simple. All he wanted to do was
recreate a second generation of these cars with
modern technology. Can I sit in this? Sure, go right ahead. MIKE: Through the ’60s, ’70s,
and even into the early ’80s, Glenn built limited numbers of
the cars that he redesigned. It’s a genuine Glenn
Pray 874 Dual Cowl Phaeton. This is a 1978 version of
a re-imagined 1936 Auburn. This is number 17
of 17 built. It’s got a patent on the design. Lincoln 460 Big Block– It’s got air conditioning in it. –and automatic transmission. Bam. Why does it have the
gauges in the back, here. To let the passenger
know what the RPMs, how fast you’re going or what’s– Well, typically back in
the ’30s, it would have been a chauffeur driven car. OK. So the little rich lady
sitting in the back seat is backseat driving telling
the chauffeur to slow down. Slow down, your up to 40. So that’s where backseat
driving came from. Oh. Oh, OK. I love today. Hey, thank you so much. – Thank you, I appreciate it.
– Frank. Thanks for letting us
look through your stuff. – Good luck with everything.
– Oh, thank you. A lot of fun. Dad would have had a lot
of fun dickering back and forth, telling stories. He loved to buy and sell. He loved the art of
the deal, and Mike and Frank are good at that. [horn honks] FRANK: See you, Doug. DOUG: Hey, bye guys.
FRANK: Take care. DOUG: See ya. Glenn Pray didn’t just
save a bunch of parts from the scrap heap. This is a guy that took one of
the great American automobile companies and moved it forward. [crickets chirping]