Are New Cars More Reliable Than Old Cars? | Carguments

Are New Cars More Reliable Than Old Cars? | Carguments


– You’re using scare tactics. Like, you’re telling people that they can’t go out and
buy a 30-year-old car. – No, you just have to be careful. – I don’t like you. (playful music) Oh, hey. Hello, and welcome to a
new episode of Carguments. The show where we argue about
some of the most irrational and time wasting topics
in the automotive world. I’m here this week with our intern and bad take haver, Mack Hogan. We’re gonna talk about whether newer cars are more reliable than
older cars, objectively. – Yes, and more specifically, the way this came about is we were talking about used cars I should get and he was asking why I would possibly want something from 2012 as
opposed to his suggestions, which were from 1985. And I said, “‘Cause I’d like to be able to “drive places without
having to worry about it.” – There’s nothing wrong
with having a newer car. – I agree.
– But I think you’re wrong in saying that any car you get from 2012 will objectively be more reliable than a car from the 80s. – Well, I’m not saying any car. But I’m saying, taken as a fleet average, the average car built
in 2012 is at leagues more reliable than the average
nearly 40-year-old car. – Here, let’s give specifics. What are you talking about exactly? – We consider a car
from 2012 basically new because they don’t breakdown that often. Because those things maybe
will eventually break, but they take forever to break. Meanwhile, something from the 80s, all of the seals, all of the wiring, all of that kind of
stuff, it’s 33-years-old. It’s gonna start breaking down and you’re gonna have more actual mechanical problems where
the car leaves you stranded. – You’re wrong. You’re wrong, you’re completely wrong. Like think about it.
– I’m completely right always and you know that. – I’m gonna toss this at you. It totally depends. How do you know you’re not buying maybe a low-mile example from the 80s that has been taken care of, looked over, really finely tuned. – There are reliable cars that were built in the 80s and there can be, but you need a perfectly kept well thing or the guy has replaced
all of the window, motors, and all of the wires, and all those things a million times as opposed to a 2012 car, where you can buy it and a guy could have beat the shit
out of it for six years and it doesn’t matter because
the car’s basically new. – No, actually it does matter because, if you are buying a car that’s been beat to shit for the past five years, then you’re gonna be the one who’ll be crawling back to your dealership begging for shit to get replaced for probably a lot more money, depending on the car than whatever– – We’re not talking money,
we’re talking about reliability. – It is all connected, Mack Hogan. – No it’s not, it’s absolutely not. I wanna be able to go places without having to worry about the
car leaving me stranded. Now, I’ll give you that maybe
the stupid Bluetooth stuff and CarPlay will stop working after, but guess what? I can still drive the car
places ’cause mechanically, modern cars are leagues more reliable. And that’s proven by fact. Cars don’t breakdown as often, newer cars are lasting longer, warranties are getting
longer, all of that stuff. You can buy a car from 2012
that’s still under warranty if you buy it from the right brand. – These are all myths. I disagree with what you’re saying. – That’s a myth, that you
can buy a car from 2012 with a warranty?
– I wanna go back to what you’re telling me about
a car that was driven– – No– – No, you hold on. A car that was built five years ago, driven into the ground
for the past five years. You’re gonna be the one who’s gonna have to go take care of all the issues that have accumulated
over the past 30 years, compared to a car that’s possibly been barely driven, garage kept, whatever. What I’m saying is, these are
factors that really matter. Like, a car could’ve been beat to the ground over the past five years or it could’ve been taken care of really nicely for 30 years. And I also think money
is a huge part of this. You don’t think people think, “Oh, it’s not reliable, “but maybe it won’t cost me much to fix.” That a thing. – No, those are two separate things. The point I was thinking
is yes, you’re right. The absolute best car from the 80s is better than the worst car that’s been distributed from 2012. But, taken as an average, if you just pick the car that was beat to crap from the 80s
and totally neglected, that car literally probably
doesn’t exist anymore. It’s been scrapped
years ago because nobody wanted to fix all the
stuff that’s gone wrong. Yes, you’re right. Now, the electronic stuff might cost more to fix in the long-term. – I’m not talking about electronics. And actually, I wanna take a
step to my personal experience. I, for the record, have
owned, to my count, 15 cars. (air horn) Not many of them have been
new, or too new or whatever. The most recent or most new car that I owned was my 2006 BMW M5, which I failed to care for properly because of how unreliable and how much it would have cost me to pay for those issues that it had. – Luckily, Aaron has just
given me exactly what I wanted, which is that he has just
proven that you shouldn’t listen to anything he ever says
because he bought an E60 M5, the world’s least
reliable car in the world. And now is using it in an
argument about reliability. – 15 cars (air horn) to one car, Mack Hogan. 15 cars to one. I know what I’m talking about. – You’re using anecdotes,
I’m using statistics. Cars don’t breakdown as
often, warranties are longer, and things are more reliable
that they’ve ever been. – But just because the car’s been on the planet for 30 years, doesn’t mean all of the parts in that car have been on the planet for 30 years. – Right. – Things have been replaced, people have cared about
these cars and cared for them and done potentially the
work that they’ve needed. It’s not an objective thing. You shouldn’t go out telling people not to look at 30-year-old cars because everything in
them is 30-years-old. It’s not true. – I’m not saying you shouldn’t
look at 30-year-old cars. I’m saying the normal car from the 80s is going to be less
reliable in the long-term than a car that you buy
that is only 5, 6 years old. – You’re wrong. – Yes, and I’m telling
you that you are wrong because you have no valid opinion based on the fact that
you bought an E60 M5. – Thank you for tuning in today to this wonderful episode of Carguments. Go out, buy your 30-year-old project cars, don’t listen to Mack, and enjoy your life. Thank you. (playful music) – [Director] We just need one without interrupting each other.