How The Car You Drive Impacts Image | Vehicles Reflect A Man’s Style Personality Perception

How The Car You Drive Impacts Image | Vehicles Reflect A Man’s Style Personality Perception


How The Car You Drive Impacts Image Vehicles
Reflect A Man’s Style Personality Perception [0:00:00] Hi! I’m Antonio Centeno. I’m the founder of
Real Men Real Style. Today, gentlemen, I’m going to be answering the question, “Does
the vehicle we drive have an effect on how other people perceive us?” Basically, do we
become what we drive? Does the vehicle that we own, does it send a signal that other people
pick up on and therefore, they form an opinion of us? Now, I’m going to base this off of a couple
of studies that I read, in addition, my own personal experience, but I would love to hear
from your gentlemen down in the comments based off of your experience, what you’ve read,
what you know about, what you’ve experienced, so I look forward to those comments. But before
we get into this, please subscribe to my YouTube channel. That way, these videos come right
to you. In addition, if you like this, if you find it useful, I’d appreciate the like. Okay, so this is the question that came in.
“Antonio, I’m a successful young man and I work in a pharmacy. I have a strong understanding
of dressing sharp, but the vehicle I drive is not pleasing to look at. Basically, it’s
an old, three-quarter ton Diesel pick-up truck. It’s loud, it smells, and whenever I drive
through town, I get kind of the evil eye from people. I’m wondering, is this holding me
back at work? Staff members or people that are my boss or higher up in the company to
me, are they going to think negatively of me based off of the vehicle I drive?” It’s a good question and something that for
his particular situation, to be honest, I don’t know if this vehicle is going to hold
him back. One of the big questions we’re going to ask is “Does it matter to everyone?” because
it doesn’t. However, there is a linked effect on the vehicle that we drive and how it affects
other people’s perceptions of us. One of the first studies was what I saw over
in Britain. This one, they surveyed almost 2000 people and they found that 57% of people
actually — and this is based on attractiveness. They said that they would rate a person as
more attractive or less attractive based off of the vehicle that they drove. They tested
a couple of other things. Twenty-one percent said they would rate a person as attractive
or less attractive based off of their job, 19% based off of confidence, 17% based off
of their intelligence, so 57% is pretty significant. So the vehicle that we drive, according to
that study — in addition, there was a 2011 study over at Temple University and they actually
ran a number of people through the ringer and they discovered that we do have an effect
or the vehicle we drive also has an effect on us and how we behave. They concluded from
that that yes, some of the assumptions we make about people and the vehicles they drive
actually is true, or in a sense, it statistically does have an effect. An example, you’re meeting me for the first
time. Say you’re in town, you’re in Wisconsin. You decide to meet Antonio up at the subway
next to his office. I pull up on a motorcycle, a Harley Davidson motorcycle versus what if
I pulled up in a minivan or if I pull up in an old, beat up Chevy pickup truck with a
big Texas grill. Now, I have owned all of those vehicles, two
of them I still own, by the way, but your perception of me — I know many of you guys
have probably watched me in my videos, so perhaps it’s going to be a bit skewed, but
if you were meeting me for the first time, if you see me pull up in a minivan, what do
you assume about me? That I’m probably going to drive the speed limit, that I have kids,
that I’m married. There are just things you’re going to want to assume there. If I show up on a motorcycle — but I don’t
have a Harley Davidson — I had a Sprint ST motorcycle. I don’t have that vehicle anymore,
but I have had a few cruisers and things like that. When I was riding motorcycles, I can
tell you that my perception of myself and who I was, was a bit different than it is
now. Nowadays, I don’t really ride bikes anymore. I’ve got kids and I want to live
to see them grow older, although I told my wife I’m going to get a bike as soon as my
kids are out of the house. But the point is oftentimes, the vehicle that we have does
have an effect on us. Now, a Chevy pickup truck, it’s very practical.
It makes sense. The grill, actually I did get that in Texas when I was stationed in
Corpus Christi and it’s been very useful up here. I hit a deer a couple of years back.
The thing just flew over to the side, no damage to my truck. Now, all of that had, people
form opinions when you see them based off of when they get out of that vehicle, whether
it’d be a work vehicle, whether it’d just be a simple vehicle. Let’s get down to the main point. Does it
matter to this gentleman? He’s a pharmacist. He works in a decent size town and he’s wondering
is this going to have a negative effect on his career. My thing is okay, who is seeing
you get in and out of this vehicle? If it’s a small company and if the people really know
you well, then I would say it’s not going to have much of an effect. They’re going to
judge you more based off your intelligence, your performance, and your ability to get
the job done. [0:04:53] However, if this is a larger company and perhaps
someone higher up or the person making the managerial decisions of where you’re going
to be placed in the company doesn’t deal with you on a day to day basis or you may
barely know, if they just know you as the guy that drives that Diesel truck that smells
and let’s say that they’re environmentalists and they’ve got a green thumb and they drive
a Prius, they may look at you as, “You know, this guy, I just feel that he just doesn’t
have the same values as me. I don’t want to see him move up in the company.” In that
case, it could have a negative effect. Now, there are certain industries in which
I would say the vehicle you drive is going to be actually pretty darn important. If you’re
in real estate, you’re driving somebody around town, you can bet the vehicle you drive, if
it smells, if it’s not clean, if it’s very impractical, if it’s got some bright colors
on it and they’re almost embarrassed to be inside of it, then yes, that’s going to affect
whether or not you’re going to close a sale, whether or not you’re going to get the deal. If you’re in sales and you’re showing up to
a client’s office and he looks out and you’re driving a $100,000 car and if you’re just
trying to lowball him on price, he’s going to wonder, “Well, what is this guy trying
to do? I can tell that he’s got money.” Understand that the vehicle you drive does send a message. Now, let’s talk about if it does matter to
you, what are the three things that you can do to in a sense mitigate it or to control
it? Well, the first thing we talked about is understanding it, but really maybe keeping
the vehicle simple. And so, if you’re going to keep the vehicle simple, what do I mean
by that? I mean non-offensive, so you don’t want to go with maybe a lime green color.
I just saw — was it a Camaro that’s for sale the other day, a big lime green. Sports car, lime green, I think that whoever
picks out that vehicle is definitely — I’m going to form an opinion of that person. If
you’re in sales, if you are in real estate, you’re probably not going to want to go with
that vehicle. In addition, think about something that is — the Prius, a number of years ago
when it first came out, a lot of people had an opinion of people that drove a Prius, the
same thing is you’re driving a dually pickup truck. Make sure that you’ve got a reason
for driving that and it has to make sense. First off, keep it simple. Second, keep it
clean. I was in a Mercedes the other day. It was 20 years old, a perfectly fine vehicle,
and it was kept immaculately clean. I had no negative perception. In fact, I just thought
that the person appreciated older vehicles and that they obviously took very care of
what they had, so no negative impression was formed. I’ve made a couple of assumptions
about the person, but by keeping your vehicle clean, that’s something that you can control
because I know not everyone out there can go out there and buy a new vehicle. Well, if you’ve got an older vehicle, keep
it clean. Also pay attention to all the details. If you’ve got a taillight that’s out, don’t
put tape — I mean temporarily, yes, you may have to put tape on it if it gets dinged up,
but get that thing replaced as soon as possible. A taillight that’s barely holding on is not
going to send the best first impression. Finally, point number there, keep it practical.
I talked about a dually pickup truck. If you grew up in West Texas and you’re moving around
trailers and you work on a farm or a ranch, sure, a dually makes sense; however, if you
live in a city and a dually is your truck moving in and around, it’s very difficult
to park that thing. It’s impractical and you have to wonder why you’re keeping this vehicle
around. Now, I know some of you guys — again, I’m not telling anyone to go out there and
buy a new vehicle, but I am saying understand that a message is being sent. That’s it. And for me, maybe you guys are
wondering, yes, I do own a minivan and I still own my almost 20-year-old Chevy pickup truck
with a big Texas grill on the front, and those probably send a message. However, I’m in the
comfortable position that most people don’t ever see me, don’t ever meet me in person,
and I’m not driving my vehicles out to conferences. I actually find that my vehicles are very
practical for what I do, so that’s why I have them. Take care, guys. I’ll see you in the next
video and I look forward to your opinions down in the comments. Take care. Bye-bye. [0:09:10] End of Audio