New Commander Classics – The 5 Best Throne Of Eldraine Cards For Commander – Magic: The Gathering

New Commander Classics – The 5 Best Throne Of Eldraine Cards For Commander – Magic: The Gathering


Throne of Eldraine. The story unfolds as the full set launches, adding 269 new cards to the already massive library of Magic: the Gathering. 269 brand new options for what might be the greatest MtG format, Commander. Which of these cards will become the new commander classic? Why bother? Why bother doing a detailed and analytical look? It’s Arcane Signet! Arcane Signet. It’s not available in regular booster packs. It’s $25 each. So there you go. That’s the new card from Eldraine for Commande, Arcane Signet. It’s a Manalith for two instead of three Show’s over! And this program was made possible… Ok. Ok. Ok. How about this? How about some restrictions? Shall we this video will only be looking at throne of Eldraine cards that appear in normal $4 booster packs of Throne of Eldraine. So all this madness of Buy-a-Box promos that are in Eldraine but not in the boosters, brawl cards that are in Eldraine the set but not in the four dollar boosters, or whatever cards may or may not be in those $40 “fun boosters”. Hey, wait a second… Just what specifically can and can’t be in those forty dollar fun boosters? [Scientific sound effect] Well, either way, this video will have the restriction of just looking at regular Eldraine cards in regular Eldraine boosters. I also want to throw on a few more restrictions to make it interesting. I will not be looking at any cards as potential commanders. This list is specifically of cards that go in the 99, as it were. Legendaries can make the list, but only if they are a legendary that I feel is likely to become a new staple of cards within a Commander deck not as a card commanding it. That being said, I do want to start with an honorable mention of a card that just isn’t quite universal enough to make the list, but I still see great potential and excitement for commander in that card. Drink deep, my friends, the honorable mention is The Cauldron of Eternity. The cauldron of eternity seems a bit overwhelming at first with 10 generic mana and double black in its casting cost, but this legendary artifact costs two generic less to cast for each creature card in your graveyard. Whenever a creature you control dies, put it on the bottom of its owner’s library. Two generic and a black and tap, pay two life: return target creature card from your graveyard to the battlefield. Activate this ability only any time you could cast a sorcery I had a great debate with myself over whether this was indeed a card we’d be seeing in a multitude of black decks or just a really potent new card for specific commanders Like well Yuriko who obviously just loves cauldron for its CMC cost, but more specifically a deck like Grenzo, who can really go to town with Cauldron. As I thought more and more about possible interactions it can have in a multitude of black decks, not to mention the fact it’s seemingly gargantuan casting cost can be reduced dramatically in many EDH builds, I began to see that while there’s a lot of versatility for this card and it does have the potential to be a recurring fixture in many lists running black, it just had too much working against it to make my main list. First off, most reanimator lists aren’t going to enjoy the effect of putting creatures into their library instead of the graveyard once Cauldron is in play. Now the well-timed play, this can still be very useful, and reanimator lists that have already dumped massive creatures into their graveyards will have an equally massively reduced casting cost, but it is still very perilous and if you don’t win outright with it, (which it isn’t really designed to do) you can end up with a reanimator nonbo on your hands. At the end of the day, it’s still not quite a new commander classic but it’s so close. Wouldn’t be surprised to see this in a lot of lists besides Grenzo, And I’m looking forward to some fun and powerful interactions with Cauldron. After all, what better thing to brew in than a cauldron? But now I want to touch on five cards that actually are going to become true staples of the new Commander classics. Let’s talk about a single card that gives us mana acceleration and tribal benefit. It might not be in your five color slivers deck, but one to two color tribal is going to wave that Heraldic Banner high. Heraldic Banner is three generic mana for an artifact, and as Heraldic Banner enters the battlefield, choose a color. Creatures you control of the chosen color get +1/+0. Tap to add one mana of the chosen color. I love this card. I also love that it’s an uncommon. But it’s two things commander players love in one, as Heraldic Banner is an anthem effect on a mana rock. Well, it doesn’t grant one mana of any color, It does let you pick the color. And mono colored decks as well as any two color tribal deck, especially those not in green, are going to really make heraldic banner a part of their core cards Think of decks like Krenko goblins, which has so little access to good mana ramp and acceleration, and where that +1/+0 is actually gonna be a noticeable advantage, or even non-aggro blue builds like Azami mono-blue Wizard tribal to again, just give that great combination of acceleration as well as a power bump. I feel just about any two color tribal deck not already in green is really going to regularly put Banner in as part of the 99. Next up at number four is the sort of land only the fables tell of. A passage to mana fixing and late-game advantage for just about every deck out there. The only thing standing in its way is a high price tag thanks to a ridiculous rarity, but nonetheless, Let’s take a look Fabled Passage. Fabled Passage is a land. Tap and sacrifice fabled passage: search your library for a basic land card, put it onto the battlefield tapped, then shuffle your library. Then, if you control four or more lands, untap that land. Note that this didn’t say for our more basic lands, just four or more lands. That’s what really makes Fabled Passage worthwhile. This is a very straightforward card. It’s another fetch land that works well in EDH and it’s just a little less effective— alright, a lot less effective—than the optimal ten Zendikar and Onslaught fetches we adore, but this is commander not modern. We don’t need to be able to fetch for a shock land with the same intensity that we do in Modern and Legacy, and the versatility to grab any basic land means that two color to five color lists will find a use. And with that untap ability, it means that late-game, the card just gets better and better. My biggest problem with Fabled Passage is not its inability to grab shock land, but rather it’s already steep price of just over $10 each. Perhaps after rotating from standard, which will be a while, it’ll then plummet, but $10 for slightly better evolving wilds in Commander is, in my opinion, the biggest factor that’s gonna keep this from being a true staple in the vast majority of decks. I mean, at that price, is it really worth it? I’m fine with Evolving Wilds and a Terramorphic Expanse. But what is worth it in Commander is to draw cards. One card, two card, three. And in what can sometimes be sloggy and multiplayer games, anything that gives you card advantage and greater access to the power of your library is— truth be told—a must-have, and if we’re looking for that truth to be told, what better source than our own magic mirror? The Magic Mirror, 6 generic and triple blue, (oh my goodness). This legendary artifact costs one generic less to cast for each instant and sorcery card in your graveyard. You have no maximum hand size, which is nice, because… At the beginning of your upkeep, put a knowledge counter on the magic mirror and draw a card for each knowledge counter on The Magic Mirror. from Narset to Muzzio to, well, once again Yuriko and Kykar, and perhaps even Nim, the Pain Artist. If you’re in blue, likely this is a card for you. That’s not to say the triple blue cost can be restrictive for tricolor decks and up, but the snowballing card draw effect of The Magic Mirror is worth shooting for, guaranteeing used some of the most massive and out-of-control card advantage in a format that greatly rewards just that. If games go too long as is often the case in Commander, that advantage it provides is just overwhelming. No, it isn’t a card you can cast early-game and suddenly steamroll with, but it is versatile, going in an enormous variety of blue and X Commander decks, and just not threatening enough at first to help ensure it sticks on the board. In fact, I feel confident saying that nearly any blue or two color blue and X Commander is going to have little excuse not to gaze into the knowledge of this magic mirror. Coming in at number two is a tie! (Shh! I’m allowed to do that! I make the rules.) Two of the most resonant and powerful new cards in white are going to be hard not to run in Commander, and I just couldn’t choose between the two. So I’m gonna talk about them both. They are Hushbringer and Deafening Silence. Hushbringer is a faerie for one generic and a white with flying and lifelink what we really like about her is that creatures entering the battlefield or dying don’t cause abilities to trigger. While Deafening Silence is only a single white for an enchantment that reads: Each player can’t cast more than one noncreature spell each turn. So no, these aren’t as universally broken as, say, Smothering Tithe. But whereas that card boosts you through the roof, these two drive your opponent’s down into the floor. Commander is filled with enter the battlefield effects or dying abilities that trigger, and these make up the vast majority of value-driven engines that allow players to go off casting multiple spells per turn. And now these two simple and low-costed cards put a huge damper on opponents’ day. Yes, they do affect us as well, but typically if you’re in white, these are not the things that you are trying to do. While creature decks can still run out of control with Deafening Silence in play, the far scarier combos often come from noncreature spells. In many ways these two cards are like two halves of a single white hosing hole. But it’s not just pillow fort decks in white and blue that are going to want to run one or both of these. As far as Throne of Eldraine cards are concerned, these two are right at the top of the list for new commander classics But there can only be one card at the very top of the list. So what is the number one card that’s a new commander classic? Well, It’s a card that more or less is going to be universally run in green, but one with a plethora of options and some real potent power. Another one of Eldraine’s over-costed spells with built-in reduction, just perfect to run amok in commander is The Great Henge The Great Henge, seven generic and double green for a legendary artifact that costs X less to cast where X is the greatest power among creatures you control. Tap to add double green and gain two life. Whenever a nontoken creature enters the battlefield under your control, put a plus one plus one counter on it and draw a card. So I think that whoever designed this forgot to build in a downside like the other cards in this cycle have. Where’s the drawback? The casting cost? This is commander and we’re in green. We’re gonna be slamming some major big power baddies down faster than you can sing the theme to Dinosaur Train. It’s win-win. In fact, a creature with seven power in play makes this only two green, which it then gives you back when it taps. The possibilities are limitless with The Great Henge. Want to create infinite mana or infinite card draw with something like an altar and a persist creature? Sure! Or just draw a card and put a counter on a nontoken creature that entered the battlefield under your control. There’s a wide variety of options here—even more so than lands like Fabled Passage. Which yeah, it’ll be run. But what does it really do for you? Not much compared to the Henge. Heraldic Hanner? I love it, but its impact is nothing compared to the henge. Ultimately, we are looking at a card here that not only slots into just about any Green Commander deck but is universally going to power them up with a myriad of options and advantages. Without a doubt in my mind, this is overwhelmingly the best new card for Commander under the restrictions we are working with. And you know what? This card is ten times better in your deck that an arcane signet is. But now I want to hear from you. What cards from Eldraine do you think are destined to become the new Commander classics? Let me know in the comments below. And remember whether you’re just buying a pack of card sleeves or booster packs of Eldraine, when you spend your money, when it is possible, when it is reasonable, try and spend that money where you spend time playing this great game, and that’s at your local game store. Your supporting your Magic: the Gathering community. And this program was made possible thanks to a sponsorship from Card Kingdom, as well as the Patreon support of viewers such as you, so thank you! [English subtitles by SwiftenCrafter] [Outro music plays]