Rookie Mistakes Driving a Manual Car

Rookie Mistakes Driving a Manual Car


– How neat is that? It’s pretty neat because we
partnered with Konig Wheels to give away a free set
of wheels, like this one, or you can find yourself another one that’s probably completely
out of frame over here. If you guys are interested in picking up a free set of Konig wheels, we actually partnered with Konig, pick up one of these t-shirts, you get entered in to win
a free set of Konig wheels. That includes the Freeform lineup, which is probably one of my favorite. Ampliform, solid, ten out of ten wheel. And of course, it’s a pretty cool shirt. I keep switching, I go to the right, I’ve never gone to the left, and that’s the way it’s gonna stay. And we’re making a donation
to the ASPCA as well. So if you guys are
interested in helping us with some puppies, get a
chance to win some wheels, sounds like a win-win scenario. After all, that’s the
rest of the sales plug. When we jump into the automotive scene, one of the first things everyone says is you need to go buy a manual car. It’s just something you gotta do. There’s no excuses to not have one. It’s gotta be a manual. Now there’s some other great reasons that manuals actually exist. They create a more raw
experience with your car, to get you more involved, and they kind of allow you
to get your little beans and it’s a lot easier to
give her the old beans if you’re in a more entry
level enthusiast car. Who doesn’t like dropping a gear and just praying nothing breaks
as you give her the geese? Keep using geese, I’m hoping
one day it catches on. It’s probably not. Only problem with that
is when driving manual, you can make plenty of mistakes that result in the poor
little guy blowing up before you even have a
chance to beat on it. Ask me how I know. It can be a bit sad. So with that being said, I’m Alex from Fitment Industries, Alex.FI, and today we’re going to be talking to you about rookie mistakes people make when they start driving a manual car, and it’s probably just
more talking about things you probably shouldn’t do, like how not to drive your manual car. By the way, if you’re looking
for aftermarket wheels, tires, or suspension, head
up fitmentindustries.com. We’ve got pretty much
everything out there, plus an aftermarket gallery
with a bunch of cool cars in it. Pretty cool place to kick it. And on top of that, in case
you want one more sales plug, be sure to subscribe, because
if you haven’t subscribed, look at all the great videos
that you’re probably not having a chance to watch. All right ready? (yelling) – Ooh! (beep) (laughing) (beep) (laughing) – Oh no! – All right ready? – All right. – Stop doing this to myself. – All right, let’s do it. – One, two, cheers. – Before you even get into manuals the first and biggest mistake people make when driving a manual car is just assuming it just automatically turns
into a race car, and no! Just because it got the old third pedal doesn’t mean you can just
bang through gears and send it because the Corolla came with the option of a five speed versus an automatic. For all practical purposes, manual options are actually
just a more affordable option for people looking to get into
an entry level vehicle car. Most of those entry level manuals aren’t really meant to be sporty, not really their thing
that they were focusing on. That means that this manual
needs to be treated nicely, and not like a drag car,
because lo and behold, probably not gonna last that long, it’s probably gonna blow up. Be nice to your manuals if it’s in a car that wasn’t really meant
to be a sporty car, ’cause you’re gonna find out
it probably isn’t gonna last. And it’s especially true
if it’s your first one. If you don’t blow it up though,
you’ll probably burn it out. Speaking of which, if
you’re driving a manual, take those dirty little
fingers off your knob! I’m serious, it sounded sexual. Don’t rest your hand on
your shift lever, okay, using the gear level as a hand rest will push the selector
fork, if you push it up against the rotating
collar it’s a big thing, and it causes some premature wear. You don’t want premature wear, right? You don’t want it, and I don’t want it. That and you need to let the
gear lever and fork select to just kind of have free
play, and move as necessary. Now you don’t want to look and, you know you don’t want
it looking like that, that would be a problem. If anything is doing
this, you don’t want that. You don’t want it looking
like a wet hot dog blowing in the breeze, it’ll
just be a little weird. A little bit of movement is okay, but you don’t want it,
you know what I’m saying. Another common mistake
when driving a manual car and I know we’ve all done it, we’ve all been there, don’t lie to me. You’re at that red light,
and you want (chuckles) you want everyone to know
that you’ve got a manual. So you put the car in first. You release the clutch
to push the car forward, and then you engage the clutch again. Then you sit there,
like you’re on a swing, just going back and forth. Doing stuff like this, or
just playing with your clutch on a hill on a hold, can actually cause some pretty intense premature wear. You just don’t wanna do it,
plus nobody really cares in all honesty if you have
a manual or an automatic when you’re at a stop sign. Use your brake like a proper adult and only use the clutch when you need to. Plus no one again notices it, I’m sorry. I thought I did, I did it one time with my 3000 GT, I
thought I was super cool then I realized when I
had to replace the clutch it wasn’t actually that good of a deal. As we go into owning more and more cars, we often find ourselves
purchasing stage three everything. What is stage three? Beats me, you know, but
I want it, and I have it. Stage three tune, stage three
coilovers, stage three APR. Stage three clutch. Regardless, when we start
upgrading our clutch and flywheel or
transmission boys and girls, we automatically assume that
it’s bulletproof, right? I mean it was $400, there’s no
way it could possibly break. Really, it truly can. When you start driving a
newly modified manual car, you have to give her
time to get used to you. These are usually called break in periods. Pretty common mistake is that
people don’t let their cars go through this break in period, with their manual transmission components, because it’s hard, it’s hard
to drive a fast car slow. Some parts may not even
have a break in period, however a common mileage amount especially with new parts like
this to be easy on the road are around 250 to 500 miles
depending on how extensive of the modifications you did, plus you have to remember that
you’re gonna need to relearn the parts that you might
have replaced or upgraded to regardless if that’s your
clutch, your flywheel, or anything in between. But just, if you’re nice to it, give it a little bit of time and then you can get really
good at using your clutch, and then you can send it. But while you’re driving, especially your first time around, you may find yourself sweating. Knees, they may be weak. Your arms, they could be perspirating. Could be sweaty, mom’s spaghetti. So nervous you is trying
to remember to be sure to clutch so that you don’t mess it up so your solution is to release the clutch as fast as possible and re-engage only be absolutely necessary. ‘Cause you don’t want anybody, you don’t wanna use the clutch, right? You don’t want it,
don’t touch it, bum bup! Just get her in there, uh uh. You got a little, uh uh. And so you do that, and your
car feels like an X fighter because it’s shaking, it’s
rocking uncontrollably, it’s lurching back and forth, all because you decided
to release the clutch just a little bit wee bit too soon. Just a little premature, don’t do that. The stress you end up creating on the clutch and the transmission ends up being much worse than just gradually engaging
and disengaging the clutch. Trust me, and you won’t look as silly, it always looks a little silly, you see like the car,
people think it’s a cam, and it’s not a cam, it’s just you not being able to drive your car, it’s just a very uncomfortable experience. The final tip we have for you is one that we need to just tell everyone, especially for the people in the back. If you just bought your
first tie horsepower car, maybe a real old drive
Mustang, Camaro, or Corvette, or other super rear happy vehicle, do not just drop the clutch until you know how it
behaves, you dumb (beep). It’s a common misconception
that people believe all manuals behave the same. And they don’t, especially when you start adding in horsepower and other things like longer wheelbases,
lightweight flywheels, tires. Here’s what you need to do,
go find yourself a back road, an empty parking lot if you will, or someplace where no one can record you making a fool for yourself and test what that clutch
drop actually feels like at a launch before you show
it off to your friends. Trust me, you can thank us later. It’s just a thing. Really, when it comes
down to rookie mistakes when driving a manual
car comes from people being super nervous about
driving their manual car or the testosterone kicks in
and they just want to show off. Usually what we recommend is testosterone is never really a good idea to show off, especially if you’re not
really experienced in it. So just take her safe there, bud. So what sort of tips do you have for somebody jumping into a manual car, drop your tip below. (chuckles) And it better not be send it. If you’re looking for aftermarket wheels, tires, or suspension, be sure to hit us up at
fitmentindustries.com. We’ve got just about
everything for your vehicle and it helps us make
bangin’ videos like this. And if you haven’t subscribed yet, look at all the killer videos that you’re probably missing out on. I’m Alex, from Fitment Industries, don’t forget we got a wheel
giveaway with Konig Wheels, description link below if you’re looking to get set up with a set of wheels. We will see you guys later. We wish you the best of luck on your manual vehicle adventures, and we hope that you don’t
make a fool out of yourself, we’d really hate to see you on YouTube and then we’ll probably
end up using that clip for some sort of video in the future. (hip hop music) Goodbye. (hip hop music)