World’s First Amphibious Helicopter Car | RIDICULOUS RIDES

World’s First Amphibious Helicopter Car | RIDICULOUS RIDES


JEFF BLOCH: This is going to be bad. JEFF BLOCH: This is the speedy copter. It’s a 1969 Bell OH-58 Kiowa Vietnam attack aircraft
and is sitting on 86 Toyota van chassis. COMM: Custom car builder Jeff Bloch, also known as Speedycop, has made a name for himself
through his incredible car creations and his latest project is perhaps even more adventurous
than his previous builds. JEFF BLOCH: This helicopter was used in Vietnam and brought back to the States. After that
it was used for parts for national police in Tennessee and I bought it for $3100. JEFF BLOCH: We did it over the course of 6
months here at my house. It took my team and I about 3000 hours to put this thing together. INTERVIEWER: So, John how much of a pain in
the ass is this freaking plate right here? JOHN: It’s a tremendous pain in the ass.
INTERVIEWER: 6000 rivets in one plate. It’s all got to come out. JEFF BLOCH: The coolest part of this whole
build wasn’t the fact that it was a street-legal road-racing helicopter that had never been
done before. It was that it was actually amphibious as well. So, you could drive off the racetrack
or off the highway, down at boat ramp and right into a lake or a river. We actually
did prove after the race that it was amphibious. We drove to a nearby lake and put it in the
water and drove around. So, it was very cool. JEFF BLOCH: 86 Toyota van that provided the chassis actually just gave us the front suspension
and the floor. We created a smooth hole underneath of that and filled the gaps with foam to provide
floatation in the water. JEFF BLOCH: In the rear we put 2002 Audi Quattro V6. That’s 220 horsepower with 30 valves. JEFF BLOCH: We road raced in the 24 hours
in Le Mans, where it actually blew up after a few laps unfortunately and that motor was
so difficult to work on that we had to pull out of the race, take it home and fix it. JEFF BLOCH: Everywhere we took this helicopter,
people were amazed. They had never seen, obviously, a road racing helicopter before
and certainly not the one that was amphibious and just the thought that this thing used
to fly in Vietnam as an attack chopper and now it was a street-legal race car that could
go in the water, their minds were blowing. It was fantastic. JEFF BLOCH: I have been planning take it to
an event in Philadelphia. We were two hours into this trip, at 5 o’clock in the morning
when the driver smelled smoke inside the helicopter. He pulled over and turned around and saw a
small flame. Got the brand new extinguisher out, pulled the pin, went to put the fire
out and nothing happened; within moments that helicopter was fully engulfed and it was a
total loss. JEFF BLOCH: It was heart breaking for all of us. 3000 hours and about US $10,000 down
the drain just that quickly in 5 minutes. It was altogether gone. It turns out the military
used a lot of magnesium in the builts of these helicopters and once you get that stuff on
fire you can’t put it out. It just burns really fast and hot. So, no one was hurt fortunately
and the chopper can be replaced but such a heart break. MAN: Yeah, but 3000 hours worth of work down
the drain for that one. JEFF BLOCH: We don’t have enough left to actually repair the helicopter and we are
not going to recreate another one. We have already done that. We want to keep building things that are new, unique and different and fun and interesting. JEFF BLOCH: We are going to move on to bigger
and better things.